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Big Brain Employed to Help Transitioning USAA Members

Big Brain Employed to Help Transitioning USAA Members

USAA members who are transitioning from the miltiary to the civilian world will now be able to call on some very significant brainpower to help them make the complicated decisions they will have to make.

  Newsradio 1200 WOAI says, in a partnership between USAA and IBM, the supercomputer Watson, which is best known for its winning streak on Jeopardy, will be called upon to help the transitioning veterans make those life decisions, in the fist use of Watson's supercomputing skill in a 'consumer-facing application.'

  John Gordon, who is Vice President of IBM's Watson Business Group, says the reason Watson, which has made the transition from a huge room sized computer to a cloud application, is so good at this is, as was seen on Jeopardy, Watson can adapt and make computations based on changing inputted information.

  "This is a system that is now going to learn from every interaction with members and will get smarter and smarter and will continue to provide them advice throughout all the complex parts of their lives," he said.

  Watson has until now been used in high level medical, physics, and financial services applications.  Under the partnership with USAA, members of the San Antonio based financial services firm will receive a Watson app for use on their computers and mobile devices to access Watson and it's huge store of knowledge.

  Gordon says this is a new step for Watson, into the consumer realm.

  "This will compliment work that is happening across out broader ecosystem announcements," he said.  "We are starting to see more entrepreneurs using Watson across a broad range of work.

  Eric Engquist of USAA says it is a major step for the company, which is known for it's financial services provided to active duty and retired military members and their families.

  "They can take very complex questions at a very complex decision point at their lives, and ask Watson what they should do and how they should do things and receive very personal and relevant advice," he said.

 

 

 

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