WOAI Local News Sponsored by Five Star Cleaners

 

Should Dishonorable Discharge be Mandatory For Convicted Military Sex Offenders?

Should Dishonorable Discharge be Mandatory For Convicted Military Sex Offenders?

  Activists who claim that the Uniform Code of Military Justice is incapable of properly dealing with sex crimes in the ranks are pointing to the convictions of two Military Training Instructors at Lackland Air Force Base this week as evidence, 1200 WOAI news reports.

 

  Tech Sgt. Brandon Johnson was convicted by a Special  Court Martial of having a 'personal and sexual relationship' with a Basic Military Training student and also with a technical training student.

 

  Johnson was ordered sentenced to three months in prison, reduced in rank to Senior Airman, and ordered to forfeit $1600 in pay.

 

  But, like Tech Sergeant Julio Morales, who was convicted of similar charges on Tuesday, Johnson was not ordered discharged from the Air Force.  The Special Court Martial had the authority to give Johnson and Morales Bad Conduct discharges if it wanted.

 

  That prompted an outpouring of claims by activist groups that the military is not truly interested in punishing sex offenders in the ranks, and claims that the Johnson and Morales cases are more evidence that sex crimes should be taken away from the UCMJ and prosecuted by local District Attorneys, just like sex crimes which take place outside miltiary bases.

 

  A bill in Congress would mandate a Dishonorable Discharge for any member of the military who is convicted of any criminal sexual misconduct.

 

  Johnson is the 21st Lackland MTI to be convicted in the sex with recruits scandal.

 

More Articles