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Message to Perry: Use Special Session to Expand Gun Rights

Message to Perry: Use Special Session to Expand Gun Rights

Second Amendment rights groups are urging Gov. Rick Perry to add the question of carrying concealed handguns onto college campuses to the agenda for the current Special Session of the Legislature, saying it is Perry's last chance to stand up  for gun rights, 1200 WOAI news reports.

 

  Kurt Mueller, a spokesman for Students for Concealed Carry, says this Special Session will be the last opportunity Perry will have to make a strong statement in support of expanding gun rights for law abiding Texans.

 

  "The governor in the past has shown support for allowing concealed carry firearms on college campuses, including, most recently, in January of this year," Mueller told 1200 WOAI news.

 

  The issue has been defeated in the 2011 and 2013 regular sessions, despite the support of the governor.  In 2011, it actually passed both houses of the Legislature, but was thrown out on a technicality.  In 2013, it passed the House, but was killed when the chairman of the appropriate Senate committee failed to allow it to be taken up.

 

  "If not now, I do not know when the opportunity would ever arise again for Governor Perry to show his stance on this issue," Mueller said.

 

  He pointed out that Perry recently traveled to Connecticut to urge gun manufacturers to move to Texas to escape onerous new gun restrictions there.  He said approving campus carry would demonstrate the state's commitment to gun rights.

 

  "The governor can attract these businesses by showing Texas to be a state that takes firearms rights seriously," he said.

 

  Campus Carry would allow students who are over the age of 21, and honorably discharged military veterans who have concealed handgun permits to carry their guns on college campuses.  College leaders oppose it, but Mueller says campus carry has been approved in several other states, without the negative outcomes predicted by Texas college officials.

 

 

 

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